johnvisiomvp

Life with Visio and other Microsoft Toys!

Posts Tagged ‘Shapes

Visio 2016 Electrical Engineering Shapes

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While researching a new PowerPoint deck on Visio 2016, I came across a supposed update to the Electrical Engineering stencil.

ee

Unfortunately, the way I learned how to draw EE shapes, long before Visio existed when I was getting my EE degree, was what was in Visio 2013. The bold lines in 2016 are distracting and so is the misalignment of the “wires”. The stubs on the components is also distracting.

Enjoy…

John Marshall… Visio MVP Visio.MVPs.org

Written by johnvisiomvp

March 13, 2017 at 1:24 am

Posted in Shapes, Visio

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Open Shape Surgery for the Visio Developer

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One of the first gotchas for new Visio developers is the UnGroup command.

Visio shapes are simple, they can have one colour and one line type. To make a traffic light, you need to group a red circle, yellow circle and a green circle. When grouped, Visio will take a collection of shapes and create a new shape with a group section and a shape collection of the shapes selected. To  ungroup, the shapes are released from the collection and the group shape is deleted. The process is reversible, some times. Shape developers learned early on, that this new shape was like any other shape and could have other sections added to it. Shape Data, User Data, Connections, Control Handles etc. Unfortunately, when these shapes are ungrouped, these extra sections are not preserved. So knowing this why would you ever want to ungroup one of these these?  You can always subselect or use the Drawing Explorer to get access to one of the sub shapes. Welcome to one of the other gotchas, the bounding box. Sometimes you have to ungroup, and create a group with a more appropriate bounding box. You can go bigger by adding a temporary shape of the desired size, lock the group from recalculating the bounding box and delete the temporary shape, but you can not go smaller without Ungrouping. You would then create a shape of the correct size, group it and before adding the other shapes to the group, lock the group shape from recalculating. The final cleanup would be to add back the component shapes and delete the temporary shape.

Early on Graham Wideman showed me a way to remove VBA projects from a Visio solution. Deleting the VBA only got you part of the way, there was still a Project stub that made Visio think the file contained a VBA solution. His solution was to edit the XML version of the file and delete the stub.

 

 

 

 

Written by johnvisiomvp

April 17, 2016 at 4:22 pm

Posted in Shapes, VBA, Visio

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Taming Geometry Sections in Visio

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Ever create a pair of shapes in Visio, butted them together and do a Union operations and find that the joining line between the shapes does not disappear and find that the new shape has two geometry sections? So, before you start to copy rows from one section to the other, place a rectangle shape over the offending line and union that with the original shape. You will now have one Geometry section. The rectangle does not have to be a precise match, just cover part of the line. You can then easily edit the Geometry section and delete the offending rows. Far easier than copying rows between Geometry Sections.

Recently I was creating shapes that basically looked like a stack of trapezoids. Rather than create the trapezoids, I created a stack of rectangles. Each rectangle was the width of the various cross sections and the height was the distance between transitions.  Once Unioned, I edited the shapesheet and deleted the extra rows that the rectangles created.

Next time I will talk about open shape surgery, a lesson learned from an old master.

Enjoy.

John Marshall… Visio MVP       Visio.MVPs.org

Written by johnvisiomvp

November 22, 2015 at 2:29 am

Posted in Shapes, Uncategorized, Visio

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Dual Outlets

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The VBA code to stack shapes was used to create a series of shapes that represented inserts into the cap of a bottle that allowed hoses to be connected. For the single connections, the shapes making up the stack were horizontally symmetrical, so after stacking the shapes it was a simple matter of aligning all the shapes around their centers. The dual connections were only slightly more complex. All the shapes were aligned around the same center, but the shape through the cap was offset from the rest. So, it was just a matter of adding a horizontal guide to align to the edge of the bottom shape above the cap and then horizontally move the part within the cap to align to the guide. The next step was to use the Size & Position window to add the horizontal offset to that shape.

So, now I had a single outlet shape with the proper offset. The next step was to group the shape, duplicate the group and align the two grouped shapes horizontally and vertically. The result is a dual version of the shape. Cleanup involved deleting the duplicated section through the cap, ungrouping and doing a Join operation to simplify the shape. Since I had to do a number of shapes of various cap sizes, outlet sizes and offsets, I kept a master of the single outlet version (the one with the offset), so I could earebuild the shapes.

Enjoy.

John Marshall… Visio MVP       Visio.MVPs.org

Written by johnvisiomvp

August 21, 2015 at 7:49 am

Posted in Shapes, Visio

Tagged with ,

Are Visio Shapes Stacked against you?

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Recently I have been working on some Visio shapes that were basically a stack of rectangles. Though Visio has tools for aligning and distributing shapes, it does not have an easy way of stacking shapes. If you are lucky enough to have shapes that are multiples of the grid size, it is a piece of cake. If not, the guides can be used to connect a shape, above or below the guide. If you want to do more than two it gets tricky. First, you have to determine the top of the shape to determine where to place the next guide. Then use the Size / Position dialog to set the position of the guide. You can then add the next shape to the guide.

This of course would be tedious, but long before Visio was acquired by Microsoft, it was the first non Microsoft company to fully implement VBA. So, now the problem is trivial, turn on developer mode and write some VBA. So, this routine will take the selected shapes and stack them.

Public Sub StackVertical()
Dim vsoSelect As Visio.Selection
Dim vsoShape As Visio.Shape
Dim ShapeH As Double
Dim OldShapeH As Double
Dim pin As Double

Set vsoSelect = Visio.ActiveWindow.Selection
If vsoSelect.Count > 0 Then
Set vsoShape = ActiveWindow.Selection.Item(1)
pin = vsoShape.Cells(“piny”).Result(“inches”) + vsoShape.Cells(“LocPinY”).Result(“inches”)

For Each vsoShape In vsoSelect
ShapeH = vsoShape.Cells(“Height”).Result(“inches”)
vsoShape.Cells(“piny”) = pin – (OldShapeH + ShapeH) / 2
pin = pin – (OldShapeH + ShapeH) / 2
OldShapeH = ShapeH
Next vsoShape
Else
MsgBox “You Must Have Something Selected”
End If

End Sub

… and the following code will stack the shapes horizontally.

Public Sub StackHorizontal()
Dim vsoSelect As Visio.Selection
Dim vsoShape As Visio.Shape
Dim ShapeW As Double
Dim OldShapeW As Double
Dim pin As Double

Set vsoSelect = Visio.ActiveWindow.Selection
If vsoSelect.Count > 0 Then
Set vsoShape = ActiveWindow.Selection.Item(1)
pin = vsoShape.Cells(“pinx”).Result(“inches”) – vsoShape.Cells(“LocPinx”).Result(“inches”)

For Each vsoShape In vsoSelect
ShapeW = vsoShape.Cells(“Width”).Result(“inches”)
vsoShape.Cells(“pinx”) = pin + (OldShapeW + ShapeW) / 2
pin = pin + (OldShapeW + ShapeW) / 2
OldShapeW = ShapeW
Next vsoShape
Else
MsgBox “You Must Have Something Selected”
End If

End Sub
Though you could do a select area, it may be safer to use the Ctrl key to select the shapes in the stacking order you want.

Enjoy.

John Marshall… Visio MVP       Visio.MVPs.org

Written by johnvisiomvp

August 14, 2015 at 1:05 pm

Posted in Shapes, Visio

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